The Third Part of the Poker Dictionary starting with letter G

The Third Part of the Poker Dictionary starting with letter G

Many of these terms are from “Winning Low Limit Hold’em” by Lee Jones.

Gutshot Straight

A straight filled “inside.” If you have 9-8 , the flop comes 7-5 -2, and the turn is the 6 , you’ve made your gutshot straight.

Terms starting with letter H

Heads Up

A pot that is being contested by only two players. Example:”It was heads up by the turn.” Another period of heads up is the final table when there are only two players left after every else has busted out.

Hit

As in “the flop hit me,” meaning the flop contains cards that help your hand. If you have AK, and the flop comes K-7-2, it hit you.

Hole Cards

Cards dealt face-down to a player – most commonly used when describing the first two player cards in Hold’em and the first four player cards in Omaha.

House

The establishment running the game. Example: “The $2 you put on the button goes to the house.”

Poker Terms starting with the letter I

Implied Odds

Pot odds that do not exist at the moment, but may be included in your calculations because of bets you expect to win if you hit your hand. For instance, you might call with a flush draw on the turn even though the pot isn’t offering you quite 4:1 odds (your chance of making the flush) because you’re sure you can win a bet from your opponent on the river if you make your flush.

Inside Straight Draw

Seeking one specific card value to make a straight. For instance, a player holding 9-5 with a board of 2-7-6 can make a straight with any eight. This is also known as a gutshot straight draw.

Poker terms starting with the letter J

Jackpot

A special bonus paid to the loser of a hand if he gets a very good hand beaten. In hold’em, the “loser” must typically get aces full or better beaten. In some of the large southern California card clubs, jackpots have gotten over $50,000. Of course, the jackpot is funded with money removed from the game as part of the rake.

Poker terms starting with the letter K

Kicker

An unpaired card used to determine the better of two near-equivalent hands. For instance, suppose you have AK and your opponent has AQ. If the flop has an ace in it, you both have a pair of aces, but you have a king kicker. Kickers can be vitally important in hold’em.

Poker terms starting with the letter L

Live Blind

A forced bet put in by one or more players before any cards are dealt. The “live” means those players still have the option of raising when the action gets back around to them.

Poker terms starting with the letter M

Maniac

A player who does a lot of hyper-aggressive raising, betting, and bluffing. A true maniac is not a good player, but is simply doing a lot of gambling. However, a player who occasionally acts like a maniac and confuses his opponents is quite dangerous.

Muck

The pile of folded and burned cards in front of the dealer. Example: “His hand hit the muck so the dealer ruled it folded even though the guy wanted to get his cards back.” Also used as a verb. Example: “He didn’t have any outs so he mucked his hand.”

Poker terms starting with the letter N

No-Limit

A version of poker in which a player may bet any amount of chips (up to the number in front of him) whenever it is his turn to act. It is a very different game from limit poker.  The best treatise on no-limit poker is in Doyle Brunson’s Super/System.

Nuts

The best possible hand given the board. If the board is K-J -T-4 -2, then A -X is the nuts. You will occasionally hear the term applied to the best possible hand of a certain category, even though it isn’t the overall nuts. For the above example, somebody with A-Qmight say they had the “nut straight.”

Poker terms starting with the letter O

Offsuit

A hold’em starting hand with two cards of different suits.

One-Gap

A hold’em starting hand with two cards two apart in rank. Examples: J9s, 64.

Open-Ended Straight Draw

Seeking one of two card values to make a straight. For instance, a player holding 9-8 with a board of 2-7-6 can make a straight with either a ten (6-7-8-9-T) or with a five (5-6-7-8-9). This is also known as an up-and-down straight draw.

Out

A card that will make your hand win. Normally heard in the plural. Example: “Any spade will make my flush, so I have nine outs.”

Outrun

To beat. Example: “Susie outran my set when her flush card hit on the river.”

Overcall

To call a bet after one or more others players have already called.

Overcard

A card higher than any card on the board. For instance, if you have AQ and the flop comes J-7-3, you don’t have a pair, but you have two overcards.

Overpair

A pocket pair higher than any card on the flop. If you have QQ and the flop comes J-8-3, you have an overpair.

Poker terms starting with the letter P

Pay Off

To call a bet when the bettor is representing a hand that you can’t beat, but the pot is sufficiently large to justify a call anyway. Example: “He played it exactly like he made the flush, but I had top set so I paid him off.”

Play the Board

To show down a hand in hold’em when your cards don’t make a hand any better than is shown on the board. For instance, if you have 22, and the board is 4-4-9-9-A (no flush possible), then you must “play the board” : the best possible hand you can make doesn’t use any of your cards. Note that if you play the board, the best you can do is split the pot with all remaining players.

Pocket

Your unique cards that only you can see. For instance, “He had pocket sixes” (a pair of sixes), or “I had ace-king in the pocket.”

Pocket Pair

A hold’em starting hand with two cards of the same rank, making a pair. Example: “I had big pocket pairs seven times in the first hour. What else can you ask for?”

Post

To put in a blind bet, generally required when you first sit down in a cardroom game. You may also be required to post a blind if you change seats at the table in a way that moves you away from the blinds. Example: a player leaves one seat at a table and takes another in such a way that he moves farther from the blinds. He is required to post an extra blind to receive a hand. See also “extra blind.”

Pot-Limit

A version of poker in which a player may bet up to the amount of money in the pot whenever it is his turn to act. Like no-limit, this is a very different game from limit poker.

Pot Odds

The amount of money in the pot compared to the amount you must put in the pot to continue playing. For example, suppose there is $60 in the pot. Somebody bets $6, so the pot now contains $66. It costs you $6 to call, so your pot odds are 11:1. If your chance of having the best hand is at least 1 out of 12, you should call. Pot odds also apply to draws. For instance, suppose you have a draw to the nut flush with one card left to come. In this case, you are about a 4:1 underdog to make your flush. If it costs you $8 to call the bet, then there must be about $32 in the pot (including the most recent bet) to make your call correct.

Price

The pot odds you are getting for a draw or call. Example: “The pot was laying me a high enough price, so I stayed in with my gutshot straight draw.”

Protect

(1) To keep your hand or a chip on your cards. This prevents them from being fouled by a discarded hand, or accidentally mucked by the dealer. (2) To invest more money in a pot so blind money that you’ve already put in isn’t “wasted.” Example: “He’ll always protect his blinds, no matter how bad his cards are.”